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Third-Party/Partner Engagement

In addition to using the media to promote your local campaign, consider engaging organizations that have a similar or compatible focus to help spread the word about recycling.

Partnering with other organizations will lend credibility to your cause and will take some of the burden for promoting the campaign off your shoulders. Here are a few ideas of whom you could work with and how:

  • Environmental Organizations: Alert them to your campaign and ask for their support. Ask if they would draft letters to the editor in support of the campaign. Include them in any launch announcements or other events. Co-sponsor special events planned for significant days such as Earth Day, America Recycles Day (November 15), July 4 celebrations or other community happenings.
  • Local Community Leaders: Set up meetings with community leaders to get their help in sharing the merits of recycling with residents in their area or utilize them as spokespersons in the local media. Their communications staff may also be looking for ways to increase their visibility, and what better way than being connected to the earth-friendly cause of recycling?
  • Local Retailers: Retailers are looking for better ways to drive traffic to their stores, and you are looking for more ways to get your message out so it can be a win-win! Partners can make brief, in-store announcements; place bins with campaign signage near entry points; display messages on bags or receipts; host bin or cart drives, etc. Flat Tommy would make a perfect in-store display here!
  • Local Businesses: Why not negotiate with the local businesses in your community for free or reduced prices for things like printing and advertising? For instance, in exchange for placement of their logo on one of your printed fliers, a professional printer should be able to eliminate or significantly reduce your printing costs!
  • Scout Troops: Local Boy and Girl Scout Troops are always looking for new and different ways to earn badges or give back to the community. Engage these troops to help distribute campaign marketing information, staff bin drive events and even organize recycling events at local schools or libraries. Or, just go to a meeting and talk to them about recycling.
  • Churches: Research indicates religious leaders are among the most trusted voices in the community. Work with local churches to hold recycling education sessions and distribute fact sheets and fliers to church members. Or start out smaller and provide short blurbs for their church bulletins. Also, get them to establish a recycling program if they don’t have one already.
  • Homeowner Associations: These associations can be a powerful voice for your recycling education program. Make use of their newsletters and Web sites by submitting articles and blurbs describing your program. Click here to download a template newsletter article and Web site blurb. Take advantage of monthly homeowner association meetings to come talk to residents about the importance of recycling. Remember to bring items to give away to residents and bring several recycling bins or carts to give to residents who need them.

Click here to download newsletter articles and Web site blurbs about the campaign that you can localize and use when partnering with these and other local community organizations.